Community-Nominated Priority Place (CNPP) for Species at Risk – Cape Freels

Cape Freels is one of the best and richest shorebird areas in Newfoundland. It’s an ecologically rich ecosystem with extremely high biodiversity (130 species of birds observed) due to its inland and coastal wetlands, variety of habitat types (beaches, sand dunes, coastal marshes, and large eelgrass meadows), its unique location, and its relatively undeveloped state. It’s a staging and wintering area for hundreds of waterfowl of various species and breeding habitat for a variety of shorebirds and other species.

Our goal is to reduce threats to Red Knot, Piping Plover, Rusty Blackbird, and the Short-eared Owl, while restoring their damaged coastal habitat, and educate the public on this important ecosystem. This project builds on related conservation work by adding threat reduction to complement existing land conservation and promotional efforts.

This Community-Nominated Priority Place (CNPP) for Species at Risk project, based in Cape Freels, is undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada through the federal Department of Environment and Climate Change.

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August 18th, 2020 – IBEC is in The Telegram

We were interviewed by The Telegram yesterday regarding our cleanup work in Cape Freels. We spoke about the importance of these cleanups and the overall Project for the area. If you’d like to read the entire article, it is available here!


August 12th, 2020 – Another Cleanup Completed in our Cape Freels Project Area

IBEC employees, students and volunteers completed the second official cleanup within our Project area, this time focusing on the Cape Island Beach portion. We collected another pickup truck full of garbage, ranging from rims, lots of plastics, crab pots, and other junk.

We continue, along with our partners, to collect shorebird and other data within Cape Freels and Queen’s Meade in Newtown. We thank the public for your interest in our Project, for assisting us when possible, and for providing us feedback on the different aspects of our Project.

This Community-Nominated Priority Place for Species at Risk project, based in Cape Freels, is undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada through the federal Department of Environment and Climate Change.


July 7th, 2020 – On Tuesday, staff and students of Indian Bay Ecosystem Corporation, Indian Bay Park, and the Town of Indian Bay participated in our first major cleanup of our Species at Risk project area in Cape Freels. We filled two pickup trucks with garbage (old nets, rugs, lots of plastics, etc.) and disposed of it in a proper manner (landfill site). Huge thank you to all who came out to assist us! It was a beautiful day for the cleanup, with everyone enjoying the sunshine! We do have more cleanups scheduled over the next couple of months.

This Community-Nominated Priority Place for Species at Risk project, based in Cape Freels, is undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada through the federal Department of Environment and Climate Change.


June 22nd – 27th, 2020 – Conducted a Short-eared Owl survey for the Town of New-Wes-Valley, in association with the provincial Wildlife division, to assist the Town in trail management and development of a trail system in Cape Freels. Images taken are from those evenings doing the survey.


May 24th, 2020 – Had a little cleanup down Cape Freels for our Species At Risk project earlier this week. Great job putting a tiny dent in the large amount of garbage in the area. Work was done by our Project Coordinator Kaylene Stagg, with assistance from her boyfriend and father (keeping within her bubble)! We’ll continue such cleanups throughout the year when possible, and hope to have more hands to help as we progress through the year.

This Community-Nominated Priority Place (CNPP) for Species at Risk project, based in Cape Freels, is undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada through the federal Department of Environment and Climate Change.


GUESTBOOK HOUSE FOR COMMUNITY-NOMINATED PRIORITY PLACE (CNPP) SPECIES AT RISK – CAPE FREELS PROJECT

April 10th, 2020 – Locally built and painted, this unique Guestbook House will be placed down Cape Freels later this Spring. The guestbook will allow locals and tourist to assist us with collecting data on several categories we’re seeking (shorebirds seen, type of activity you’re participating in, if you’re visiting, what drew you to Cape Freels, etc.). We plan to use data collected towards our Species at Risk project, especially to get a sense of what those outside the research community feel about the area. Our Project Coordinator, Kaylene Stagg, will collect the book daily and record any data written in it.

Built by Wayne Bruce of Wesleyville (with just the use of a couple images, no drawings or plans whatsoever) and painted by artist Janet Davis of Brookfield (free-hand and not in her normal painting style), this red-stage Guestbook House is something we’re very proud of. We thank Wayne and Janet for assisting us on creating this work of art for our project.

If you’d like to check out more of Janet’s work, please visit her website at https://nortonscove.com/. She’s got some online sales on that might interest you!

The images below show the completed build process and completed painted process.

This Community-Nominated Priority Place (CNPP) for Species at Risk project, based in Cape Freels, is undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada through the federal Department of Environment and Climate Change.


QUICK-REFERENCE SHOREBIRD GUIDES FOR CAPE FREELS & QUEEN’S MEADE

March 18th, 2020 – IBEC’s Quick-Reference Shorebird Guide is now available, for free, at our office in Indian Bay!

Funded by the Department of Environment and Climate Change Canada via our Conserving and Understanding the Species at Risk of Cape Freels project, these Guides are great for beginners or avid birdwatchers. Specific to Cape Freels and Queen’s Meade in Newtown, you can easily identify shorebirds you’ll see when within the Project area.

Quick-Reference Guides will also be available later this Spring/Summer at tourism locations along The Shore.


SHOREBIRDS OF CAPE FREELS


QUEEN’S MEADE (NEWTOWN) VIDEO

December 4th, 2019 – Here’s a video of our Community-Nominated Priority Place (CNPP) for Species at Risk Cape Freels Project area. This is Queen’s Meade (pronounced Maid) portion of Newtown, which is just a few kilometres across from our main area in Cape Freels. Its a conservation area protected by the Town of New-Wes-Valley under the Municipal Habitat Stewardship Agreement. Shorebirds are very active in this area, plus it is the location of the newly built bird blind, which we plan to use for photography and research (built for the public to use for those purposes).

We’d like to thank Wayne Lorenzen for the great video work and the usage of his drone.

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